The Welfare Effects of Integrating AIDS Treatment with Food Transfers: Evidence from Zambia

Nyasha Tirivayi, Maastricht Graduate School of Governance

The thesis evaluates the clinical and household outcomes from integrating AIDS treatment with household food aid rations. The dissertation systematically reviews available literature and highlights the current research gap in the evidence base, especially on the household outcomes of such programmes. The evaluation is carried out after 6 months of programme implementation using propensity score matching, double difference and instrumental variables techniques. Empirical findings from the evaluation are as follows: 1) Adding food transfers to Anti-retroviral Therapy (ART) improves adherence to medication but has no effect on the weight gain. 2) Although the food rations are inframarginal, they have large and positive effects on household consumption and food security, and this is even larger among the poorest households. 3) Food transfers are a labour supply incentive for male non-patient adults especially at low income levels while for females this is conditional on high income levels and the patient having spent a longer time on treatment. However, food transfers are a labour supply disincentive for patients. The main conclusion of the thesis is that food transfers generally have a beneficial impact on the recipients, while the findings have important implications on the targeting and weaning strategies of the programme.

Venue: Minderbroedersberg 4-6, Maastricht

Date: 07 July 2011

Time: 12:00 - 13:30


UNU-MERIT