Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Levelling Latin America
Mining innovation can bring more sustainable and inclusive growth, especially across the Americas…
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/mining-in-latin-america-using-innovation-to-level-the-playing-field/



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All headlines
  • A mystery source is producing banned ozone-destroying chemicals
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  • Facebook privacy: Europe to press Zuckerberg
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  • Facebook to exclude billions from European privacy laws
    Facebook has changed its terms of service, meaning 1.5bn members will not be protected under tough new privacy protections coming to Europe. The move comes as the firm faces a series of questions from lawmakers and regulators around the world over its handling of personal data.

    The change revolves around which users will be regulated via its European headquarters in Ireland. The move will see Facebook users outside the EU governed by Facebook Inc in the US rather than Facebook Ireland. It is widely seen as a way of the social network avoiding having to apply the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to countries outside the EU.

    The change will affect more than 70% of its more than two billion members. As of December, Facebook had 239 million users in the US and Canada and 370 million in Europe. It also had 1.5 billion members in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America, and they are the ones affected by the change. Users in the US and Canada have never been subject to European rules.

    In 2008, Facebook set up its international headquarters in Ireland to take advantage of the country's low corporate tax rates but it also meant all users outside the US and Canada were protected by European regulations. The change will mean users outside Europe will no longer be able to file complaints with the Irish data protection commissioner or in the Irish courts.

    GDPR, due to come into force next month, offers EU consumers far greater control over their data. It also promises to fine firms found to have breached data rules up to 4% of their annual global revenue.

    BBC News    April 19, 2018