Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Breaking silos, nudging communities: The SITE4Society adventure
UNU-MERIT's Site4Society (S4S) aims to foster home-grown social innovation. It starts from the premise that knowledge need not be cold or aloof, but can in fact serve various social challenges. In the case of S4S, we address the clear lack of networks between academics from different disciplines and between social scientists and the rest of the world ? on the SDGs in particular. So the main aim is to break open silos and start unconventional conversations through interactive workshops.

For our second S4S event held last week we hosted speakers from across the local innovation system, including Brightlands (an institution supported by the Limburg government to nurture start-ups), sustainably.io (getting to be a start-up), DSM corporate sustainability division (a Dutch multinational present in 50 countries), GoodGood (a social enterprise), LOCOtuinen (a cooperative), Bandito Espresso (a social enterprise) and Maastricht University (an academic institution!). Find out more about this initiative by clicking the link below.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/breaking-silos-nudging-communities-the-site4society-adventure/



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    Researchers from the University of Maryland in College Park found that the densified wood could withstand being stretched or pulled 11.5 times harder than its natural counterpart without breaking. That makes it about as strong as steel, even though it's more lightweight. Stainless steel pellets fired from an air gun and moving at 30 metres per second easily busted through a typical wooden plank, but got lodged in a stack of densified wood sheets with the same total thickness.

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    Science News / Nature    February 07, 2018