Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Breaking silos, nudging communities: The SITE4Society adventure
UNU-MERIT's Site4Society (S4S) aims to foster home-grown social innovation. It starts from the premise that knowledge need not be cold or aloof, but can in fact serve various social challenges. In the case of S4S, we address the clear lack of networks between academics from different disciplines and between social scientists and the rest of the world ? on the SDGs in particular. So the main aim is to break open silos and start unconventional conversations through interactive workshops.

For our second S4S event held last week we hosted speakers from across the local innovation system, including Brightlands (an institution supported by the Limburg government to nurture start-ups), sustainably.io (getting to be a start-up), DSM corporate sustainability division (a Dutch multinational present in 50 countries), GoodGood (a social enterprise), LOCOtuinen (a cooperative), Bandito Espresso (a social enterprise) and Maastricht University (an academic institution!). Find out more about this initiative by clicking the link below.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/breaking-silos-nudging-communities-the-site4society-adventure/



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    'Cheddar Man', Britain's oldest, nearly complete human skeleton, had dark skin, blue eyes and dark curly hair when he lived in what is now southwest England 10,000 years ago. The finding suggests that the lighter skin pigmentation now seen as typical of northern Europeans is far more recent than previously thought, according to researchers from University College London (UCL) who took part in the project.

    Unearthed in 1903 in a cave at Cheddar Gorge, in the county of Somerset, the Mesolithic-era man was a hunter-gatherer whose ancestors migrated into Europe at the end of the last Ice Age. Three hundred generations later, around 10% of indigenous British ancestry can be linked to Cheddar Man's people, scientists say.

    Experts from the Natural History Museum's ancient DNA lab drilled a tiny hole into the skull in order to extract genetic information. The DNA was unusually well-preserved, enabling the scientists to sequence Cheddar Man's genome for the first time and to analyse it to establish aspects of his appearance. Then, a pair of Dutch artists who are experts in palaeontological model making, Alfons and Adrie Kennis, used a high-tech scanner to make a three-dimensional model of Cheddar Man's head.

    The model, which UCL and the Natural History Museum said rendered Cheddar Man's face with unprecedented accuracy, shows a man with dark skin, high cheekbones, blue eyes and coarse black hair.

    Reuters    February 08, 2018