Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Rethinking Redistribution
For this edition of Alumni Watch, we caught up with Dr. Andres Mideros Mora of Ecuador, who graduated from the UNU-MERIT PhD programme earlier this month. He defended his thesis, 'Essays on the Economic Effects of Non-contributory Social Protection', while taking a short break from his role as Minister of Planning and Development of Ecuador.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/we-need-to-think-about-redistribution-globally-dr-andres-mideros-mora/



Subscribe and receive
I&T Weekly by email
 
email address

text
html


Please type the above code:
 
All headlines
  • US regulators ditch net neutrality rules as legal battles loom
  • World Bank to stop fossil fuel financing after 2019
  • Europe moves closer to own satnav system with latest Galileo launch
  • Electric eel inspires new power source
  • NASA discovers our solar system's twin using neural network
  • New material heals, not cracks, under pressure
  • Engineers create plants that glow
  • Feather-light artificial muscles lift 1000 times own weight
    Foldable artificial muscles can lift 1000 times their weight, be made in just 10 minutes and cost less than a dollar.

    Soft robots are getting better, but greater flexibility has a trade-off as softer materials are often weaker and less resilient than inflexible ones, limiting their use. But now researchers from Harvard University have created a 2.6-gram 'muscle' that can lift a 3-kilogram object - a weight to strength ratio equivalent to a newborn lifting a Land Rover.

    The origami-inspired robot looks a bit like a bag with many chambers, each filled with air or water. When a vacuum is applied, the fluid is sucked out, contracting the muscle and driving the motion.

    It can be made of a range of materials, and to test it in various forms the researchers used metal springs, packing foam and plastic sheets, among other things. The ability to use soft materials will allow the robot to directly but safely interact with humans in industrial settings, the team hopes.

    New Scientist / PNAS    November 27, 2017