Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

Master's Open Day at UNU-MERIT
UNU-MERIT will host a Master's Open Day on Saturday 24 March 2018. Our top-ranked MSc in Public Policy and Human Development (MPP) emphasises the connection between public policy and decision-making processes, as well as the principles of good governance.

Students who successfully complete our Master's programme receive a double degree issued by the United Nations University and Maastricht University. Several information sessions will be offered throughout the day and visitors will have the opportunity to talk with staff and students.
Chinese Aid to Africa
Increasing growth and wealth, but ignoring abuse and corruption? Our study strikes a hopeful noteā€¦

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  • Cake-cutting game theory trick could stop gerrymandering
    The method to fairly split a cake between two people is tried, tested, and mathematically proven. One person gets to cut the cake and the other gets to choose which slice they get. To get the biggest piece of cake, the cutter must split it fairly resulting in no hard feeling between the two eaters.

    In American politics, however, cutting states into electoral districts doesn't have a similarly fair method. The political party in charge often decides where the electoral lines are drawn and does so in such a way to gain an advantage - a process called gerrymandering. But now researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have come up with a way to extend the cake cutting technique to electoral redistricting to make the system a lot fairer.

    With the new approach, one political party gets to draw an electoral map that divides the state into the agreed number of districts. The second political party then chooses one district to freeze so that no more changes can be made to it by either side. They then get to redraw the rest of the map.

    Once the new map is complete, the first political party freezes one of the new districts so that no further changes can be made to it, and is allowed to redraw the rest of the map again. This process goes back and forth until every district within the state is frozen. In Pennsylvania, for example, this would require 17 cycles as there are 18 districts.

    New Scientist / arXiv    November 01, 2017