Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Amsterdam Water Week
Young entrepreneurs from 'Finish Society India' and 'Sidian Bank Kenya' were honoured in this year’s 'Sarphati Sanitation Awards'’, presented at the opening ceremony of Amsterdam International Water Week on 30 October 2017.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/unu-partners-honoured-at-amsterdam-international-water-week-2017/



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All headlines
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  • Cosmic rays point to mysterious void in Great Pyramid of Giza
    Scientists using an imaging method based on cosmic rays have detected a large and enigmatic internal structure in the last of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing, the massive Great Pyramid of Giza. The Great Pyramid, or Khufu's Pyramid, was built during the reign of Pharaoh Khufu (Cheops), who reigned from 2509 to 2483 BC.

    The newly discovered void is located above a huge, known hall called the Grand Gallery. To peer inside the pyramid, the scientists used an imaging technique called muon tomography that tracks particles that bombard Earth at close to the speed of light and penetrate deeply into solid objects.

    They said the newly discovered internal structure was at least 30 metres long, and located above a hallway called the Grand Gallery, one of a series of passageways and chambers inside the immense pyramid.

    The findings come from a project called Scan Pyramids that relies on non-invasive scanning methods to probe the internal structure of the pyramids of ancient Egypt's glorious Old Kingdom period and understand how they were built.

    Muon particles originate from interactions between cosmic rays from space and atoms of Earth's upper atmosphere. The particles can penetrate hundreds of metres into stone before being absorbed. Placing detectors inside a pyramid can discern cavities within a solid structure.

    CBC / Reuters    November 02, 2017