Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

Master's Open Day at UNU-MERIT
UNU-MERIT will host a Master's Open Day on Saturday 24 March 2018. Our top-ranked MSc in Public Policy and Human Development (MPP) emphasises the connection between public policy and decision-making processes, as well as the principles of good governance.

Students who successfully complete our Master's programme receive a double degree issued by the United Nations University and Maastricht University. Several information sessions will be offered throughout the day and visitors will have the opportunity to talk with staff and students.
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  • Artificial intelligence smart enough to fool Captcha security check
    Computer scientists have developed artificial intelligence that can outsmart the Captcha website security check system. Captcha challenges people to prove they are human by recognising combinations of letters and numbers that machines would struggle to complete correctly.

    Researchers developed an algorithm that imitates how the human brain responds to these visual clues. The neural network could identify letters and numbers from their shapes.

    The research as conducted by Vicarious - a Californian AI firm funded by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg.

    The Captcha test was developed in the late 1990s to prevent people from using automated bots to set up fake accounts on websites. Computers usually struggle to pass such tests, and Google says that its reCaptcha test is so complicated that even humans can only solve it 87% of the time. However, researchers from Vicarious claim that their algorithm can pick out distorted letters and digits from images.

    The team developed Recursive Cortical Network (RCN), a software which mimics actual processes in the human brain while requiring less computing power than a neural network. The RCN software was also able to solve reCaptcha tests from Captcha generator BotDetect at a 64.4% success rate, Yahoo Captchas at a 57.4% success rate and PayPal at a 57.1% success rate.

    BBC News / Science    October 27, 2017