Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Master's Open Day at UNU-MERIT
UNU-MERIT will host a Master’s Open Day on Saturday 7 October 2017. Our top-ranked MSc in Public Policy and Human Development (MPP) emphasises the connection between public policy and decision-making processes, as well as the principles of good governance.

Students who successfully complete our Master’s programme receive a double degree issued by the United Nations University and Maastricht University. Several information sessions will be offered throughout the day and visitors will have the opportunity to talk with staff and students.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/events/event-abstract/?id=1660



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  • Need a creativity boost? Try listening to happy background music
    Need inspiration? Happy background music can help get the creative juices flowing. Researchers from Radboud University in the Netherlands and the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia have been studying the effect of silence and different types of music on how we think.

    They put 155 volunteers into five groups. Four of these were each given a type of music to listen to while undergoing a series of tests, while the fifth group did the tests in silence. The tests were designed to gauge two types of thinking: divergent thinking, which describes the process of generating new ideas, and convergent thinking, which is how we find the best solutions for a problem.

    The team found that people were more creative when listening to music they thought was positive, coming up with more unique ideas than the people who worked in silence. However, happy music only boosted divergent thinking. No type of music helped convergent thinking, suggesting that it’s better to solve problems in silence.

    The findings could be used to enhance creative thinking in places like educational institutions or laboratories. Happy music may work because it is more stimulating, so boosts divergent thinking by arousing the brain, according to the researchers.

    New Scientist / PLoS One    September 06, 2017