Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
I&T Weekly holiday break
I&T Weekly is taking a holiday break. We will be back on Friday, January 12, 2018 with a fresh selection of innovation and technology news. On behalf of the entire UNU-MERIT team, we wish our readers an excellent 2018!




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All headlines
  • France announces landmark ban on fossil fuel production
  • Extreme laser bursts may lead to practical nuclear fusion
  • Gene editing staves off deafness in mice
  • Integrated circuits could make quantum computers scalable
  • 'Water cloak' uses electromagnetic waves to eliminate turbulence
  • Cold cigarette lighter will power satellite
  • Need a creativity boost? Try listening to happy background music
    Need inspiration? Happy background music can help get the creative juices flowing. Researchers from Radboud University in the Netherlands and the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia have been studying the effect of silence and different types of music on how we think.

    They put 155 volunteers into five groups. Four of these were each given a type of music to listen to while undergoing a series of tests, while the fifth group did the tests in silence. The tests were designed to gauge two types of thinking: divergent thinking, which describes the process of generating new ideas, and convergent thinking, which is how we find the best solutions for a problem.

    The team found that people were more creative when listening to music they thought was positive, coming up with more unique ideas than the people who worked in silence. However, happy music only boosted divergent thinking. No type of music helped convergent thinking, suggesting that it’s better to solve problems in silence.

    The findings could be used to enhance creative thinking in places like educational institutions or laboratories. Happy music may work because it is more stimulating, so boosts divergent thinking by arousing the brain, according to the researchers.

    New Scientist / PLoS One    September 06, 2017