Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Africa bridging the digital divides: New policy note
Information and communication technology is developing rapidly in Africa – but there are worrying trends, such as a growing digital divide between men and women, and between urban and rural areas. These are the basic findings of a new policy note by Prof. Samia Nour, an affiliated researcher at UNU-MERIT.
See: https://www.merit.unu.edu/africa-bridging-the-digital-divides-new-policy-note/



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    BBC News    June 08, 2017