Migration and the post-2015 development agenda

Professor Ronald Skeldon, University of Sussex/Graduate School of Governance

Migration is not one of the existing MDGs and rightly so. This presentation reflects on if and how migration should be incorporated into what will follow the present MDGs, the so called post-2015 development agenda. The existing MDGs will be reviewed as well as what may follow. Both the MDGs and what will follow after 2015 were, and will be, products of their times and the world has changed since the turn of the century. The new development agenda should reflect that change. The case is made that migration is an integral part of the achievement of MDGs but cannot be a goal in its own right. However, migration and mobility need to be presented as expected consequences of the post-2015 development agenda.



About the speaker
Ronald Skeldon is a Professorial Fellow in the Department of Geography in the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex. He is also Professor of Human Geography at the Graduate School of Governance, Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Professor Skeldon took a B.Sc. (Hons) in Geography at the University of Glasgow in 1967 and a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1969 and 1974 respectively. During his career, he has worked as a Research Fellow at the New Guinea Research Unit of the Australian National University, the Papua New Guinea Institute for Applied Social and Economic Research, the United Nations and, for many years, the University of Hong Kong. He has been at the University of Sussex since 2000. From 1 June 2009 to 31 March 2011, he was seconded to the Department for International Development (DfID) as a Senior Research Fellow. He has also been a consultant for many international organizations, including the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Population Division and the Social Science Research Council in New York. In 2013, he held a consultancy at the Bauhinia Research Foundation in Hong Kong. His research is based around issues of population, migration and development, primarily in East and Southeast Asia. His recent work has focused on circular migration, the impact of the financial crisis and on migration and the millennium development goals. He has published several books and many articles and book chapters. For more see: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/global/internal/departments/geography/people/person/117619

Venue: Conference Room

Date: 09 January 2014

Time: 12:30 - 13:30


UNU-MERIT