Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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All headlines
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  • Physicists create a 2-D magnet
    The number of 2D materials has exploded since the discovery of graphene. However, this menagerie of single-atom-thick semiconductors, insulators and superconductors has been missing a member: Magnets. In fact, physicists weren't even sure that 2D magnets were possible, until now.

    Researchers from MIT the University of Washington and report the first truly 2D magnet, made of a compound called chromium triiodide. The discovery could eventually lead to new data-storage devices and designs for quantum computers. For now, the 2D magnets will enable physicists to perform previously impossible experiments and test fundamental theories of magnetism.

    The team found that not only was a single atomic layer of chromium triiodide magnetic, but also that this property emerged at what is considered a relatively warm temperature: about -228 °C. They also discovered that a two-layered sheet of this material is not magnetic, but when a third is added the substance becomes a ferromagnet again. The material remains magnetic if a fourth layer is added, but gains other properties the researchers say they're still investigating.

    Eventually physicists would like to find a 2D magnet that works at room temperature and that doesn't have to be protected from oxygen, so that it might eventually be used in consumer electronics.

    Scientific American / Nature    June 08, 2017