Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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All headlines
  • Why modern mortar crumbles, but Roman concrete lasts millennia
  • Cleaning bots can zap bacteria out of water in minutes
  • Bee brains can help cameras to take better photos
  • Nanotechnology can turn windows into mirrors
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  • Evidence for string theory could be lurking in gravitational waves
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  • Press Association wins Google grant to create automated news stories
  • Scientists create low-cost CO2 splitter
    Scientists have developed the first low-cost system for splitting carbon dioxide (CO2) into carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen - a process that's crucial if we're going to ramp up renewable energy use in the future.

    This splitting process has long been identified as a promising way of turning renewables into fuel without increasing the levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, but until now, no one had come up with a method that was cheap enough to be practical.

    The solution devised by a team from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland is based on an electrolysis technique using copper-oxide nanowires modified with tin oxide, which splits CO2 with an efficiency of 13.4% running on solar power.

    Once CO is released, it can be combined with hydrogen to produce synthetic carbon-based fuels, which means CO2 gets taken out of the atmosphere, and we get clean fuel at the other end - a win-win. Current methods for doing this are prohibitively expensive, and need more energy to break down the CO2 than they put out in return, which is why this new method is potentially so exciting.

    Science Alert / Nature Energy    June 07, 2017