Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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All headlines
  • Why modern mortar crumbles, but Roman concrete lasts millennia
  • Cleaning bots can zap bacteria out of water in minutes
  • Bee brains can help cameras to take better photos
  • Nanotechnology can turn windows into mirrors
  • Sun's gravity could power interstellar video streaming
  • Evidence for string theory could be lurking in gravitational waves
  • Tesla to build world's largest lithium ion battery in Australia
  • Press Association wins Google grant to create automated news stories
  • Scientists make synthetic photosynthesis possible
    Photosynthesis is one of nature's most efficient phenomena: aside from providing much of the oxygen human beings need to breathe, this naturally occurring process gives plants the food and energy they need to survive. It uses visible light to provide the 'fuel' they need.

    Researchers have been working on ways to artificially recreate this natural process in labs, in the hopes of producing fuel - specifically methane. Now, a team of chemists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory and Virginia Tech have designed two supramolecules, each made up of a number of light-harvesting ruthenium (Ru) metal ions attached to a single catalytic centre of rhodium (Rh) metal ions.

    While both could act as catalysts, the researchers set out to determine which of the two supramolecules they created did the job best. They found that the one with six Ru light absorbers could produce some 280 hydrogen molecules for every catalyst in a 10-hour period. Meanwhile, the supramolecule with only three Ru ions could produce 40 hydrogen molecules for 4 hours - at which point it stopped working.

    To promote catalysis, the Rh catalyst must be low enough in energy to accept the electrons from the Ru light absorbers when the absorbers are exposed to light. What that means is that the larger of the supramolecules was slightly more electron-deficient, which made it more receptive to electrons needed for synthetic photosynthesis.

    Moreover, synthetic photosynthesis can be used to remove pollutants in the air as well, because CO2 is a necessary component in the process.

    Science Alert / Journal of the American Chemical Society    June 09, 2017