Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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All headlines
  • Why modern mortar crumbles, but Roman concrete lasts millennia
  • Cleaning bots can zap bacteria out of water in minutes
  • Bee brains can help cameras to take better photos
  • Nanotechnology can turn windows into mirrors
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  • Portable translator converts text to braille in real-time
    Students at MIT have designed a portable device that converts text to braille in real-time. Their first prototype was created in a 15-hour hackathon in early 2016. Since that time, the device, called Tactile, has undergone extensive development. Now, it's the size of a candy bar and completely portable. The students have applied for a patent for the device, although they are already working on its next iteration.

    What really sets Tactile apart from other braille translators, though, is its low cost. Most of these devices are expensive, and limited to the translation of text that is available digitally. For example, the HumanWare Braillant attaches to a computer or mobile device to translate text into braille, and it costs USD 2,595. Tactile's creators hope to sell their device for less than USD 200.

    The students have plans to improve Tactile. If they're successful, this would make the device simpler to use and eliminate the reader's need to remember where they are on the page.

    Tactile, which should be on the market within two years, will make any book in any library accessible to those who do understand braille - and it will also make braille itself far more accessible and easy to learn.

    Science Alert     May 19, 2017