Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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  • New sunscreen features melanin-mimicking nanoparticles
    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created a sunscreen that both mimics and enhances the skin's natural protective abilities.

    The team were able to tap into the skin's defence mechanisms using nanoparticles of oxidised dopamine. Tests showed the particles mimic melanosomes, the organelle in skin cells that synthesizes, stores and transports melanin. Researchers first developed the nanoparticles two years ago while studying the behaviour of melanins in bird feathers.

    Researchers believe their breakthrough could yield treatments for vitiligo and albinism, diseases caused by defects in the body's melanin production system. Patients diagnosed with vitiligo and albinism are at a much higher risk of skin cancer.

    Melanosomes are produced by cells called melanocytes, found among the bottom layers of the epidermis. The organelles deliver melanin to keratinocytes, skin cells in the upper layer of the epidermis. There, melanin goes to work protecting skin cells from ultraviolet radiation.

    In lab tests using tissue culture, researchers showed the nanoparticles are absorbed and distributed throughout keratinocytes just like natural melanin. The nanoparticles also protected skin cells from DNA damage caused by ultraviolet radiation.

    UPI / ACS Central Science    May 17, 2017