Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Standing up for Science
Continuing our drive to ensure research is both understood and applied globally, we travelled to Ghana for the second round of our science reporting workshop ‘Reach & Turn’. Along with our sister institute UNU-INRA and the UN Info Centre Accra we led two days of learning and debate with around 50 researchers, communications officers, and journalists from five mainly West African countries (Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Togo and Rwanda). For some this was a real innovation: the first time they had shared a platform with people from outside their field.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/ghana-reach-and-turn-2017/
Call for Papers: 10th Conference on Model-based Evidence on Innovation and DEvelopment (MEIDE)
The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers from around the world to discuss various aspects of innovation and its relation to economic development. Priority will be given to empirical papers, but there is also room for methodological and theoretical papers, as well as for case studies, as long as they address the issue of innovation and development. Innovation is to be understood broadly as any kind of innovation in what firms, households, communities and governments do, or in the way they operate. It also includes knowledge creation, diffusion, measurement and evaluation issues. Development comprises growth but also welfare, poverty alleviation, environmental concerns and fairness in the distribution of wealth/income. Since last year, we have enlarged the scope of the conference to include papers based on macro or industry data.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/meide10/



Subscribe and receive
I&T Weekly by email
 
email address

text
html


Please type the above code:
 
All headlines
  • 3D-printed ovaries successfully restore mouse's fertility
  • Scientists develop the most efficient water-splitting catalyst yet
  • New sunscreen features melanin-mimicking nanoparticles
  • Plasma jet engines that could take you from the ground to space
  • Hydrogen-bond strength measured directly
  • Portable translator converts text to braille in real-time
  • New sunscreen features melanin-mimicking nanoparticles
    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created a sunscreen that both mimics and enhances the skin's natural protective abilities.

    The team were able to tap into the skin's defence mechanisms using nanoparticles of oxidised dopamine. Tests showed the particles mimic melanosomes, the organelle in skin cells that synthesizes, stores and transports melanin. Researchers first developed the nanoparticles two years ago while studying the behaviour of melanins in bird feathers.

    Researchers believe their breakthrough could yield treatments for vitiligo and albinism, diseases caused by defects in the body's melanin production system. Patients diagnosed with vitiligo and albinism are at a much higher risk of skin cancer.

    Melanosomes are produced by cells called melanocytes, found among the bottom layers of the epidermis. The organelles deliver melanin to keratinocytes, skin cells in the upper layer of the epidermis. There, melanin goes to work protecting skin cells from ultraviolet radiation.

    In lab tests using tissue culture, researchers showed the nanoparticles are absorbed and distributed throughout keratinocytes just like natural melanin. The nanoparticles also protected skin cells from DNA damage caused by ultraviolet radiation.

    UPI / ACS Central Science    May 17, 2017