Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods
Developing competence and specific skills to effectively perform evidence-based academic or policy-oriented research is essential for knowledge creation and decision-making, whether in business, government or civil society. The Evidence-Based Policy Research Methods (EPRM) course, offered by UNU-MERIT aims to equip participants with the fundamental tools for designing and analysing evidence-based research.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/eprm/



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All headlines
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  • Scientists develop the most efficient water-splitting catalyst yet
    Scientists from the University of Houston have found a new way to split water into hydrogen and oxygen that's cheap and effective - and it may lead to an abundance of clean hydrogen fuel in the future.

    Hydrogen is a big source for clean energy, but the challenge is making enough of it to be efficient and practical price. A newly developed catalyst now reportedly addresses both issues, boasting more efficiency for a lower cost than existing solutions.

    To split water into hydrogen and oxygen, two reactions are needed - one for each element. The main issue has been getting an efficient catalyst for the oxygen part of the equation. The new catalyst is made up of a ferrous metaphosphate and a conductive nickel foam platform, a combination of materials the team says is more efficient and less expensive than existing solutions. It can also operate for more than 20 hours and 10,000 cycles without a hitch.

    Using the new method means hydrogen can be produced without creating waste carbon. And until now, oxygen reactions have often relied on electrocatalysts that use iridium, platinum, or ruthenium - 'noble' metals that are difficult and expensive to source. Nickel, in contrast, is more abundant and so easier and cheaper to get.

    Science Alert / PNAS    May 17, 2017