Maastricht Economic and social Research and  training centre on Innovation and Technology

 
Standing up for Science
Continuing our drive to ensure research is both understood and applied globally, we travelled to Ghana for the second round of our science reporting workshop ‘Reach & Turn’. Along with our sister institute UNU-INRA and the UN Info Centre Accra we led two days of learning and debate with around 50 researchers, communications officers, and journalists from five mainly West African countries (Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Togo and Rwanda). For some this was a real innovation: the first time they had shared a platform with people from outside their field.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/ghana-reach-and-turn-2017/
Call for Papers: 10th Conference on Model-based Evidence on Innovation and DEvelopment (MEIDE)
The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers from around the world to discuss various aspects of innovation and its relation to economic development. Priority will be given to empirical papers, but there is also room for methodological and theoretical papers, as well as for case studies, as long as they address the issue of innovation and development. Innovation is to be understood broadly as any kind of innovation in what firms, households, communities and governments do, or in the way they operate. It also includes knowledge creation, diffusion, measurement and evaluation issues. Development comprises growth but also welfare, poverty alleviation, environmental concerns and fairness in the distribution of wealth/income. Since last year, we have enlarged the scope of the conference to include papers based on macro or industry data.
See: http://www.merit.unu.edu/meide10/



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All headlines
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  • Scientists develop the most efficient water-splitting catalyst yet
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  • Scientists develop the most efficient water-splitting catalyst yet
    Scientists from the University of Houston have found a new way to split water into hydrogen and oxygen that's cheap and effective - and it may lead to an abundance of clean hydrogen fuel in the future.

    Hydrogen is a big source for clean energy, but the challenge is making enough of it to be efficient and practical price. A newly developed catalyst now reportedly addresses both issues, boasting more efficiency for a lower cost than existing solutions.

    To split water into hydrogen and oxygen, two reactions are needed - one for each element. The main issue has been getting an efficient catalyst for the oxygen part of the equation. The new catalyst is made up of a ferrous metaphosphate and a conductive nickel foam platform, a combination of materials the team says is more efficient and less expensive than existing solutions. It can also operate for more than 20 hours and 10,000 cycles without a hitch.

    Using the new method means hydrogen can be produced without creating waste carbon. And until now, oxygen reactions have often relied on electrocatalysts that use iridium, platinum, or ruthenium - 'noble' metals that are difficult and expensive to source. Nickel, in contrast, is more abundant and so easier and cheaper to get.

    Science Alert / PNAS    May 17, 2017